Plans

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The Second Most Important Thing

In any emergency situation lasting more than a few hours, there's one thing more important than any other.

Water.

But after that, when thinking about long term trouble, the second most important thing is probably something you don't think about when planning. It certainly isn't something you can pack in your bug out bag.

The second most important thing is relationships. If you don't have good relationships with your neighbors, with people at the destinations of your bug-out, with those you'll need to rely on when the phone is out, when the cars have no gas, when the internet is down, then it won't matter if you have all the water and food and ammo you'll ever need. Because you can't do it all alone.

Do you know your neighbors? Can you rely on them in a pinch? If not, why not? When walking to the nearest main road becomes an adventure, it will be good to know the names of the people whose doors you may need to bang on.

No Oceanside Retirement Home for Me!

I think I'll stay here in the foothills. No way would I put my faith or money into any sort of home or getaway on the ocean. Here's why.

Even if you aren't directly affected by a sea level rise, what do you think the economic repercussions of coastal flooding will be? And then there are your relatives who will want to come and stay with you after their beach front home floods.

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A Master Plan

Here's a work in progress--a "how to" thought experiment on how to be ready for the future. This won't be aimed at the camo-wearing crowd--more the boingboing.net reader. You know, people who enjoyed When SysAdmins Ruled the Earth.

Getting Out: Your Guide to Leaving America (Process Self-reliance Series)

Had enough? Whether you find the government oppressive, the economy spiraling out of control, or if you simply want adventure, you're not alone. In increasing numbers, the idea is talked about openly: Expatriate. Over three hundred thousand Americans emigrate each year, and more than a million go to foreign lands for lengthy stays. But picking up and moving to another country feels like a step into the void. Where to go? How to begin? What to do? Volume 2 of the Process Self-Reliance Series, this smartly designed two-color guidebook walks you through the world of the expat: the reasons, the rules, the resources, and the tricks of the trade, along with compelling stories and expertise from expatriate Americans on every continent. Getting Out shows you where you can most easily gain residence, citizenship, or work permits; where can you live for a fraction of the cost of where you're living now; and what countries would be most compatible with your lifestyle, gender, age, or political beliefs. So if you've had enough of what they're selling here and want to take your life elsewhere-well, isn't that the American way? At any rate, it's not illegal. Not yet, anyway.

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