preparation

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/mdawson/public_html/preppedforanything/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

I Promise I'm Not a Survivalist Nut. So...

I'm not a nut.
Really.
Sure, back in the 70's in high school I used to listen to a cheap radio between classes, just to make sure no one was announcing the nukes were flying--you know, so I could run and hide between social studies and gym--but I'm not a nut.
I don't live in a secluded mountain fastness surrounded by barbed wire and purebred dobermans. I don't count my ammo or spend my weekends sighting in my 30-06 Springfield at 300 yards. I haven't fired a gun in 20 years. I don't own one, but I probably will soon.
I live in a nearly suburban home, work as a computer guy and seem pretty typical if you were to pass me on the street.
And my dogs might come running at you as you come to the house, but they'll just want to play.
But I do think a little differently.

In an Emergency, Will You Know Your Friends’ and Family’s Phone Numbers?

In the age of the smartphone and dialing by touchscreen, few of us can tick off our loved ones’ numbers on command. ... This has less to do with the faulty memories of modern man than the absence of any day-to-day need to dial by number. As memory champ and Moonwalking with Einstein author Joshua Foer writes, “Once I’d reached the point where I could squirrel away more than 30 digits a minute in memory palaces, I still only sporadically used the techniques to memorize the phone numbers of people I actually wanted to call.

The Second Most Important Thing

In any emergency situation lasting more than a few hours, there's one thing more important than any other.

Water.

But after that, when thinking about long term trouble, the second most important thing is probably something you don't think about when planning. It certainly isn't something you can pack in your bug out bag.

The second most important thing is relationships. If you don't have good relationships with your neighbors, with people at the destinations of your bug-out, with those you'll need to rely on when the phone is out, when the cars have no gas, when the internet is down, then it won't matter if you have all the water and food and ammo you'll ever need. Because you can't do it all alone.

Do you know your neighbors? Can you rely on them in a pinch? If not, why not? When walking to the nearest main road becomes an adventure, it will be good to know the names of the people whose doors you may need to bang on.

Yummy Stuff for Kitchen or Storage

We eat this stuff all the time anyway, and with a special price at Amazon right now, it made sense to get a bunch of Annie's shells and cheese.
The individual boxes are small and easy to store.
This isn't great stuff for long term storage, but will help quite a bit if you're stuck in a short term break down of grocery delivery systems. Or just too tired to go to the store!

Because You Have to Chop Wood

I recall watching Frontier House on PBS a year or two ago. I was particularly struck by one snippet of info: the experts who rated how well each family had prepared for the winter unanimously and uniformly felt that none of the families had stored up enough wood. They even warned all of them at the start with a line like "If you don't have some other chore to do, you should be chopping wood."
It takes a lot of wood to get through a winter without heat, especially if you're in the midwest or north. This is a good axe with a strong handle, though the replacement guarantee might not do you any good if the local Home Depot has been looted.
Fiskars Pro Chopping Axe, available from Amazon.

Technorati Tags: ,

No Oceanside Retirement Home for Me!

I think I'll stay here in the foothills. No way would I put my faith or money into any sort of home or getaway on the ocean. Here's why.

Even if you aren't directly affected by a sea level rise, what do you think the economic repercussions of coastal flooding will be? And then there are your relatives who will want to come and stay with you after their beach front home floods.

Technorati Tags:

Could You Manage in a National Epidemic?

Here's a very simple example of separating the wheat from the chaff.

If a flu epidemic broke out in your country, and the only thing you had do to to survive was to keep you and yours at home for two weeks without contact with any other person, would you survive?

Now, suppose that the power went out. (Power companies need people to come to work to keep the power flowing. It isn't automatic.) How about now?

Syndicate content